Recent General Posts

Tis The season For Safety

6/13/2017 (Permalink)

The NFPA reports local fire departments respond to an average of 250 Christmas tree related fires each year, with a majority of these fires caused by electrical problems. Make sure to take precautions this year.

  • If you have an artificial tree, be sure it is labeled, certified, or identified by the manufacturer as fire retardent.
  • If you choose a live tree, pick a tree with fresh needles that do not fall off when touched.
  • Make sure the tree is at least three feet away from any heat source, like fireplaces, radiators, candles, heat vents or lights.
  • Make sure the tree has plenty of water everyday.
  • After the holidays, properly dispose of your tree.  Dried-out trees can be a fire hazard and should not be left in home or garage, or placed outside the home.

Why Seeking Professional Help After a Fire is the Best Option

3/15/2017 (Permalink)

No one plans for a fire to erupt in their home or business. Unfortunately, fire damage can occur at any time especially during this time of year. Space heaters, fire places, cooking equipment and candles are all perfect examples that could ignite your home into flames. Some people’s first reaction after a fire is to begin cleaning it up themselves. Here’s why you shouldn’t.

Water Damage – When the fire department responds to a fire in a home or business, they spray gallons of water into your property. The water will get everywhere- furniture, electronics, ceilings, clothing, floors, etc. The longer you wait to remove the water, the faster the damage will set in. Don’t try to remove the water yourself. You will waste valuable time that could be sent soaking up that damaging water. Calling SERVPRO of Tri-Cities is the best option to quickly, efficiently and professional remove the water and to begin remediation to your home or business.

Soot Damage/ Smoke Damage – along with the extensive damage a fire can cause, soot and smoke damage is just as tricky. Smoke will get everywhere and travel throughout your home or business. It will affect everything in your home from furniture, clothing, walls, ceilings and floors. Soot will also be left behind staining walls and ceilings. SERVPRO of Tri-Cities has the necessary products to property remove smoke and soot damage, as well as treating the contents affected by the fire.

Effected Contents – In some cases, a homeowner will discard their personal items effected by fire or smoke damage. This is another reason why you should call SERVPRO of Tri-Cities. We can asses and inspect items to determine whether they are salvageable or unsalvageable. Our team will collect every item and thoroughly document each item to keep track and inventory all contents. A lot of times, we can clean and deodorize the effected contents.

Leave it to the professionals who have been restoring fire damages for over 30 years. We have the people, the tools, the equipment and the experience to handle any size disaster. Don’t try to handle it on your own. Time efficiency is key when it comes to a fire in your home or business.

Extreme Heat

7/20/2016 (Permalink)

General Extreme Heat Stay cool and take the proper precautions in this extreme heat!

This weekend, temperatures are expected to reach the 3-digit mark! SERVPRO of Tri-Cities wants you and your family to be safe and take the proper precautions during this time of extreme heat. When temperatures reaching this high, the body must work extra hard to maintain a normal temperature.

Extreme Heat can cause the following:

Heat Exhaustion - Typically occurs when people exercise heavily or work in a hot, humid place where body fluids are lost through heavy sweating. Blood flow to the skin increases, causing blood flow to decrease to the vital organs. This results in a form of mild shock. If not treated, the victim's condition will worsen. Body temperature will keep rising and the victim may suffer heat stroke.

Heat Stroke - A life-threatening condition. The victim's temperature control system, which produces sweating to cool the body, stops working. The body temperature can rise so high that brain damage and death may result if the body is not cooled quickly.

To prepare for extreme heat, you should:

  • To begin preparing, you should build an emergency kit and make a family communications plan.
  • Install window air conditioners snugly; insulate if necessary.
  • Check air-conditioning ducts for proper insulation.
  • Install temporary window reflectors (for use between windows and drapes), such as aluminum foil-covered cardboard, to reflect heat back outside.
  • Weather-strip doors and sills to keep cool air in.
  • Cover windows that receive morning or afternoon sun with drapes, shades, awnings, or louvers. (Outdoor awnings or louvers can reduce the heat that enters a home by up to 80 percent.)
  • Keep storm windows up all year.
  • Listen to local weather forecasts and stay aware of upcoming temperature changes.
  • Know those in your neighborhood who are elderly, young, sick or overweight. They are more likely to become victims of excessive heat and may need help.
  • Be aware that people living in urban areas may be at greater risk from the effects of a prolonged heat wave than are people living in rural areas.
  • Get trained in first aid to learn how to treat heat-related emergencies.

What you should do if the weather is extremely hot:

  • Listen to NOAA Weather Radio for critical updates from the National Weather Service (NWS).
  • Never leave children or pets alone in closed vehicles.
  • Stay indoors as much as possible and limit exposure to the sun.
  • Stay on the lowest floor out of the sunshine if air conditioning is not available.
  • Postpone outdoor games and activities.
  • Consider spending the warmest part of the day in public buildings such as libraries, schools, movie theaters, shopping malls, and other community facilities. Circulating air can cool the body by increasing the perspiration rate of evaporation.
  • Eat well-balanced, light, and regular meals. Avoid using salt tablets unless directed to do so by a physician.
  • Drink plenty of water; even if you do not feel thirsty. Avoid drinks with caffeine. Persons who have epilepsy or heart, kidney, or liver disease; are on fluid-restricted diets; or have a problem with fluid retention should consult a doctor before increasing liquid intake.
  • Limit intake of alcoholic beverages.
  • Dress in loose-fitting, lightweight, and light-colored clothes that cover as much skin as possible. Avoid dark colors because they absorb the sun’s rays.
  • Protect face and head by wearing a wide-brimmed hat.
  • Avoid strenuous work during the warmest part of the day. Use a buddy system when working in extreme heat, and take frequent breaks.
  • Check on family, friends, and neighbors who do not have air conditioning and who spend much of their time alone.
  • Avoid extreme temperature changes.
  • Check on your animals frequently to ensure that they are not suffering from the heat. Go to a designated public shelter if your home loses power during periods of extreme heat. Text SHELTER + your ZIP code to 43362 (4FEMA) to find the nearest shelter in your area (example: shelter 12345).

With temperatures this hot, give your body a break and take a swim!

Public Pools:

Petersburg’s Farmer Municipal Pool: http://bit.ly/2a9zLUR

Hopewell Community Pool: http://bit.ly/2a0TKVr

Information provided by: https://www.ready.gov/heat